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Monday, March 6, 2017

Employment Contracts in a Nutshell

The contemporary workplace has become increasingly complicated as many businesses are governed by a wide range of state and federal employment laws. Moreover, the relationship between employers and employees has also become more complex, particularly as the work force becomes more diverse. For this reason, business owners should consider utilizing employment contracts to clarify these associations.

While such agreements may not be necessary across the board, they are well suited for executives, sales people, or those who have either a decision making role or an ownership interest in the business. As such, the first element of a comprehensive employment contract is a description of the employee's duties and the duration of employment.

Obviously, an employment contract should specify the salary that is being paid as well as any work-related benefits: bonuses, vacation pay, health insurance, expense accounts, stock options and retirement plans. The contract should also clarify whether the employee is working at will and the grounds for termination. It is important to note that an employee who is fired for reasons not stated in the agreement may have grounds for a wrongful termination lawsuit.

Depending on the nature of the business, it is also necessary to protect sensitive information with confidentiality provisions. In particular, it is crucial to protect trade secrets, such as formulas, designs, practices, client lists or any other information that is generally not known to the public. Moreover, employees should be notified that all work product is owned by the business. Similarly, if the entity has relationships with independent contractors or freelancers, it is important to clarify that anything they produce is on a work-for-hire basis.

In addition to confidentiality provisions, it may also be necessary to include a non-compete clause clarifying that an employee will not accept a similar job with a competitor in the geographical region for a specified period of time.

In the end, there are a number of benefits to utilizing employment contracts. In addition to helping to retain key employees and minimize the costs of training new people, employment contracts give a business control over performance standards. Further, these agreements provide protection against the potential misappropriation of trade secrets and other intellectual property. Ultimately, these agreements help to clarify the rights and obligations of both the employer and the employee. By engaging the services of an experienced employment law attorney, a business can put in place a well designed employment agreement.


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Business Advocate Law PLLC is based in Seattle, WA and servers Western Washington with services tailored to business owners. Areas we serve include Kenmore, Woodinville, Seattle, Kirkland, Redmond, Lynnwood, and the surrounding areas of Western Washington.



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1700 7th Avenue, Suite 2100, Seattle, WA 98101 | Phone: 206-954-9200 | Cell: 206-369-3912